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January 2014 Archives

Paul Ryan gives hope that House will address immigration in 2014

As many in Miami already know, reforms to current U.S. immigration law have been a hot topic of discussion recently on Capitol Hill. While the need for immigration reform has been recognized by members on both sides of the aisle for quite some time, actions have taken a lot longer to catch up to words. A bill proposing sweeping immigration reforms from the Senate passed from President Obama's desk to the House last summer. Yet disputes over certain aspects of the bill stalled its momentum. With economic issues taking precedence in the current legislative session, as well as an election cycle on the horizon, whisperings had begun to circulate that the issue of reform was dead for now.

Man facing deportation gets his criminal convictions thrown out

The path to U.S. permanent residency or citizenship can be a difficult one. From the time immigrants arrive in Miami, they essentially begin what could be viewed as a "trial period" during which they are expected to demonstrate a willingness to obey their new country's laws and statutes. Yet those working for permanent residency are only human and, like many, are subject to moments of poor judgment. Yet for them, their mistakes could very easily impede their progress to permanent residency and possibly get them deported to their countries of origin.

Lack of immigrant workers concerns both contractors, employees

Those in Miami and elsewhere across the country listening in to what's being said about immigration reform already know that one of the issues being reviewed in this legislation is employment immigration. Many often fail to realize the impact that immigrant workers have on certain aspects of the American economy. While the professions most talked about by lawmakers seem to center on highly-skilled jobs such as doctors, engineers, and executives, it's the lower-level blue-collar workers that seem to be in short supply. That may soon change, as more and more construction contractors are discovering a shrinking pool of available workers and are taking these concerns to local lawmakers.

Unexpected change in immigration status costs woman her job

Just as there are many people currently living in Miami who immigrated to the U.S. and eventually chose to become American citizens, there may be just as many who live here but have not yet been given formal permission to do so. By not applying for legal residency or beginning the process of becoming a full-fledged U.S. citizen, they deny themselves certain opportunities such as the chance to vote in local, state, and federal elections, as well as the chance to work for any state or federal agency. Yet despite such residency restrictions being in place, there have been a few cases that have seemingly exposed the need for greater immigration status oversight.

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