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September 2016 Archives

Undigitized fingerprint data leads to faulty background searches

An immigrant who wants to make Florida a permanent home has a number of carefully designed steps to take in order to prove he or she is a good candidate to become a U.S. citizen. One of these is the biometrics appointment, which is when the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services gathers information such as fingerprints and other identification that can be used to check a person's background.

What do you need to know about building permits in Miami?

The subject of permits in Florida may seem confusing, but it is a topic that you should be familiar with if you are planning to purchase a home in Miami in the near future. The City of Miami Building Department notes that once you own the property, any open or expired permits will be your responsibility.

What are the benefits of dual citizenship?

When you are taking the steps to become a U.S. citizen, you may be thinking of making Florida your permanent home. However, that does not have to mean that you no longer have a home in your country of origin. In fact, many foreign nationals may find the idea of losing their citizenship abroad difficult emotionally. Dual citizenship may be the answer, and by choosing this option, you may also enjoy a number of benefits.

What you should know about deed-in-lieu of foreclosure

Trying to keep up with a mortgage in the middle of other financial difficulties can create a situation that feels impossible to homeowners in Miami. Although a person may want to let the house go and focus on other expenses, it may not be obvious how to accomplish this without going into foreclosure, an event from which it may take years to recover. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau points out that a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure may be the answer.

Do I need to apply for a change to my nonimmigrant status?

While you came to Miami, Florida, from another country with documentation that limits your activities in the United States, you are not necessarily restricted from changing course and doing something else. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services explains that in some cases, you do not need to worry about new documentation. On the other hand, some changes, such as adjustment of status, require you to fill out separate paperwork.

Ensuring uniform, healthy landscaping in your condo community

One of the benefits you may enjoy while living in a Miami, Florida, condominium is the pleasant outdoor environment. This is a typical outcome of well-written rules outlined in your community’s bylaws, covenants and regulations. If you are a member of the board of directors, working on these documents requires careful consideration to best suit the needs of all the residents. We at Cuevas and Garcia, P.A., Attorneys at Law, have worked with many homeowners’ associations that are interested in hiring outside help to take care of landscaping and common areas.

Fraud and the EB-5 visa

For foreign nationals who are looking for investment opportunities, building projects in Florida may provide more than a return on their money. The potential for an EB-5 visa and U.S. permanent residency may also be a draw. According to the Wall Street Journal, developers of condominiums in Miami have seen an influx in foreign investors from Turkey who believe the opportunities are sound, and are considering making the move to Florida.

Bad immigration advice may have lasting consequences

No matter what prompts foreign nationals to move to the Miami-Dade area from another country, if they plan to become a permanent resident, they need to file the right forms and meet the requirements of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Identifying these may be challenging, as each must first determine which status will best suit the individual circumstances for remaining legally in the country. Many people turn to a professional such as an attorney for help with the process.

Is your loan servicer fulfilling its duties?

When you applied for your mortgage loan, you may have chosen your lender carefully based on your financial plan and what rates were offered to you. However, a different company may be servicing your loan, and this change may not be entirely welcome, particularly if you have come under hard times and are having difficulty making payments. According to Reuters, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recognizes that some mortgage servicers are not treating their customers fairly, and that federal agency is working to correct the injustices.

Working with a student visa

Many people who attend school in Florida also work part-time or full-time jobs to help pay for tuition, fees and other living expenses or to gain experience in their field of study. An immigrant who is in the United States with an F-1 student visa may be in a similar position, but without a work visa, it may not be clear what avenues of legal employment may be available. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services explains that immigration law does address this issue so that foreign students may benefit from job opportunities.

Does the FHA rule override a “no pets” policy?

Many people in Florida choose to share their lives with animals, and you may consider your companion to be a member of the family rather than a pet. However, there is a federal law that may affect the legal role of your dog, cat or other animal, and whether it is permitted to live in a condominium or cooperative building that has a “no pets” rule. Michigan State University’s College of Law explains that the Federal Housing Administration states that an animal providing vital emotional support may be considered an assistance animal rather than a pet.

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Cuevas, Garcia & Torres, P.A.
Attorneys at Law

Miami
7480 S.W. 40th Street
Suite 600
Miami, FL 33155
Toll Free: 877-801-4135
Phone: 305-461-9500
Fax: 305-448-7300
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Midtown Miami
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